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Floating: The ripple effect

DSC_0138In order to seek benefits of floating in salt water, North Americans used to travel halfway around the globe. The Dead Sea, known as Salt Sea, is a hypersaline lake bordering Israel and Jordan. With 33.7% salinity, it’s one of the saltiest bodies of waters on the planet, and provides natural buoyancy. It’s a popular tourist destination, and was the world’s first health resort.

Personally, I hadn’t given much thought to the idea of floating in salt water. Until now. Here in Winnipeg, FLOAT.Calm has five floatation tanks (referred to as ‘pods’), each in a private room, and each containing 26 centimeters of water saturated with Epsom salt. Climb in your pod, close the door, lie back, and feel yourself instantly rise up to the surface… Read entire story.

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Nordik Spa-Nature: Chelsea, Quebec

nordik_automne_17Did you know the largest spa in North America is a spectacular sprawling setting on a hillside in Chelsea, Quebec? And that Winnipeg’s Wildwood Park neighbourhood will soon be home to its sister facility?

If you’ve driven down Crescent Drive lately, you may have noticed construction on the edge of Crescent Drive Golf Course. This is the development of Thermëa by Nordik Spa-Nature, a thermal spa set in the heart of nature. It’s the second Canadian location for an exceptional spa concept that has been popular for centuries across Europe. Read entire story.

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